License Renewal

license renewal process

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) has applied for a 20-year extension of its operating licenses for the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. The current operating licenses for Diablo Canyon’s two nuclear reactors expire in 2024 and 2025, respectively. PG&E has applied to continue operations until 2044/2045.

Mothers for Peace has challenged this license extension.  Pertinent documents can be found below.

2015 - 07 - 04 MOTHERS ON THE MOVE!

TWO NEW DEVELOPMENTS FROM MOTHERS FOR PEACE: MOTHERS FOR PEACE TRAVELING TO WASHINGTON, D.C FOR ORAL ARGUMENTS NEW LEGAL CHALLENGE IN FEDERAL COURT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE PLANS

2015 - 06 - 10 Failure of PG&E to Properly load radioactive wastes

Event Reports from the NRC indicate that as of June 6 and 7 two spent fuel casks had been loaded improperly at the Diablo Canyon nuclear plant in Avila Beach, CA. Upon further inspection, San Luis Obispo Mothers for Peace discovered that 19 of the 34 dry casks that have been loaded at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) have been loaded IMPROPERLY.

2015 - 04 - 16 New Seismic Contentions Filed

MOTHERS FOR PEACE CONTENDS DIABLO CANYON IS NOT PROTECTED AGAINST REASONABLY FORESEEABLE SEVERE EARTHQUAKES AND FLOODS. Group urges U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to refuse 20-year license term extension for lack of risk analysis and environmental protection measures.

2014-10-29 Mothers for Peace joins other environmental groups and NRDC in lawsuits challening NRC failure to comply with 2012 court ruling on nuclear waste storage

Nine environmental groups and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) filed separate lawsuits today in the D.C. Court of Appeals challenging the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) decision to proceed with an “extended waste storage rule” and a generic environmental impact statement that fail to comply with a 2012 federal court ruling that had previously reversed the NRC.

2014 - 10 - 29 Mothers for Peace and NRDC Challenge NRC Failure to Comply with Court Ruling on Nuclear Waste Storage

Nine environmental groups, including San Luis Obispo Mothers for Peace, and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) filed separate lawsuits today in the D.C. Court of Appeals challenging the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) decision to proceed with an “extended waste storage rule” and a generic environmental impact statement that fail to comply with a 2012 federal court ruling that had previously reversed the NRC.

2014 - 09 - 29 MOTHERS FOR PEACE URGES NRC TO HALT RELICENSING OF DIABLO CANYON DUE TO FAILURE TO ADDRESS 2012 COURT RULING

Mothers for Peace joined with 16 other groups nationwide to stop licensing and relicensing of nuclear facilities because of NRC failure to address critical waste issues. MFP attorney Diane Curran states: “NRC has long acknowledged that before licensing a reactor, the Atomic Energy Act requires it to make Waste Confidence findings that spent fuel can be safely disposed of in a geologic repository at some point in the future. The NRC even said it would not license a reactor if it could not make such a finding. Yet, the NRC has now arbitrarily dropped those findings from its regulations, claiming they are not necessary. The absence of Waste Confidence findings is a significant safety issue that should concern the public because spent fuel poses a serious public health and environmental hazard from which the public and environment can only be protected long-term with a geologic repository. Yet there is no repository in sight today.”

2014-02-18 Mothers for Peace demands NRC suspend all licensing decisions until pool fire risks are assessed

WASHINGTON, D.C. - February 18, 2014 (Investorideas.com newswire) New information from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) showing that even a small nuclear reactor pool fire could render 9,400 square miles uninhabitable and displace 4.1 million Americans on a long-term basis are among the factors causing 34 environment organizations to file a petition with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to hold off on additional reactor licensing.